Being an Engineer

Jacob Morrise | Acing Your Senior Capstone Engineering Project

March 11, 2022 Jacob Morrise Season 3 Episode 10
Being an Engineer
Jacob Morrise | Acing Your Senior Capstone Engineering Project
Show Notes Transcript

Jacob Morrise has a decade of experience in product design, Jacob heads design and development at Morrise Products. As the father of 10 children, he is consistently pushing product designs to help individuals and family. Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees in Mechanical Engineering from BYU-Idaho and BYU. Now he serves as adjunct faculty in Brigham, acting as a Capstone Coach helping a team senior engineering students on their final projects.

Jacob is the inventor on 5 issued patents and multiple other patents under review, primary mechanical designer on over 2 dozen products that have been brought to market, and a principle mechanical designer on products that have sold tens of thousands of units.  You probably own or use products Jacob has designed.

 You can find Jacob  on his website here, or on LinkedIn here.

Starting and Growing My Business: 

https://www.churchofjesuschrist.org/self-reliance/course-materials/starting-and-growing-my-business 

Co-host Rafael Testai: https://www.linkedin.com/in/testai/ 

 

The Being An Engineer podcast is brought to you by Pipeline Design & Engineering. Pipeline partners with medical & other device engineering teams who need turnkey equipment such as cycle test machines, custom test fixtures, automation equipment, assembly jigs, inspection stations and more. You can find us on the web at www.teampipeline.us.  

 

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Presenter:

Hi everyone, we set up this being an engineer podcast as an industry knowledge repository, if you will, we hope it'll be a tool where engineers can learn about and connect with other companies, technologies, people, resources and opportunities. So make some connections and enjoy the show.

Jacob Morrise:

And part of it is just a willingness to just go and try. It's this, I just ran into something that I have no idea how to get past. And I'm going to go I'm going to google it. I'm going to think of just whatever way I could do and try it. Try whatever it is until I find a solution.

Rafael Testai:

Hello, everyone, welcome to the being an engineer podcast. I'm your co host, Rafael Testai. And today we have a very special guest, Jacob Morrise. He has a decade of experience in product design. He's also the head design and development of marine products. As the father of listen to this 10 children. He's consistently pushing product designed to develop designs to help individuals and families. He has a bachelor's and master's degrees in mechanical engineering from BYU, Idaho, and BYU. Now, he serves as adjunct faculty and bring him acting as a capstone coach helping a team of senior engineers students on their final projects. So if you're an engineering student listening to this podcast, and you're about to your capstone, you may want to listen to this. Jacob is the inventor of five issued patents and multiple other patents under review, primary mechanical designer of over two dozen products that have been brought to market it principal mechanical designer and products that have sold 10s of 1000s of units, you probably own or use products Jacob has designed. So right away for meeting this introduction, your your mini biography is not only you're involved in the academia, but you also have real world experience, being a product mechanical design engineer, and that I think sets you apart. So congratulations on that.

Jacob Morrise:

Thank you.

Rafael Testai:

And welcome to the show. Appreciate it. Well, first of all, also, congratulations on your 10 children. How do you manage your schedule? How do you make this work?

Jacob Morrise:

You know, it's crazy. I was just thinking about it. We go I started my own business about three years ago. Right? Right about the exact same time my wife and I find out we she was pregnant with our 10th kid. And so a lot of it is just support for my wife, letting me do this, letting me start a business letting me kind of pursue my dreams. But we've got we've got 10 Kids, our oldest is 12. Our youngest is two. So they're pretty packed in there. But have a good kid good kids, my wife is great with them. And work seems to work out just fine.

Rafael Testai:

Well, I want to actually if it's okay, ask a couple questions about this. Because I know quite a bit of other engineers who are fathers listening to this. So a lot of team members here a pipeline, who sponsors a podcast, and what are how does she allow you to pursue your dreams any more specifics on that?

Jacob Morrise:

i A lot of it's just she knows kind of what, what if I was wanting to do product design. It's it's scary to stop having a full time job making consistent money when you have 10 kids. I mean, it's scary anytime. But it's especially scary when you have 10 kids. And a lot of just she is she is good with the kids. She knows what they need and kind of doesn't is open to me trying new things, spending money to get business started and all that kind of stuff. And so we I mean, we talk about it a lot. I let her know what I'm doing. And sometimes she has to help me by keeping the kids quiet while I'm on meetings or whatnot. So they're making too much noise in the house, which you'll probably hear him a few times over this because they're out hopping around and screaming and all sorts of things out there. But yeah, just just mainly it's it's understanding support and give me free rein but but helping me achieve what I want to achieve rather than complaining about why aren't we? Why aren't we buying a boat or whatever?

Rafael Testai:

Very well said. Is there the last question about family but I'm just very curious about this. Is there any advice that you will have for setting up your routine to make everything work?

Jacob Morrise:

for as being an engineer with with dads or just dads in general?

Rafael Testai:

More specifically? Yeah, like dads that have multiple children that are engineers that have more of the traditional family where the woman takes care of the children, how do you set up your routine, so it all works.

Jacob Morrise:

So I've got a separate room in the basement, that's my office that I kind of have just locked. So the kids don't come in here and mess up anything while I'm doing it. And then, so it's kind of my wife supports me in what I do, and I do my best to be a good dad for the rest of the time. A lot of it is I mean, I have several sons who are now want to be engineers, my 12 year old and my 10 year old want to be engineers and love math. And so I'll share with them things that I do and let them know kind of, hey, this is the cool thing. Dad's working on stuff that I can share with him. Obviously, this is the cool stuff dad's working on and get them get them kind of excited. And sometimes bring them to the office and show them 3d printers and whatnot. Just a lot of it's being engaged with your kids.

Rafael Testai:

Absolutely.

Jacob Morrise:

Kind of a to me, it's not my job. It's it's not my company. It's my family's company. It's my family's job. We're kind of all in this together.

Rafael Testai:

Absolutely. Well said, Well, maybe one day, you could share with them. That Dad was in a podcast and check it out.

Jacob Morrise:

Nah. Sure. Will.

Rafael Testai:

So let's let's switch gears. Now I wanted to ask you about who are a couple of mechanical product designers that you admire and why.

Jacob Morrise:

Oh men, well, there's the obvious ones, like all the guys at IDEO, he watched those, learn about them and watch that throughout school. And then I have, I mean, I've had various various professors, teachers that I've worked with that have kind of shown me what's possible, give me the options to kind of think outside of the box. So yes, maybe not one, one specific, famous name, but just a lot of little people here throughout my life that I've seen do things and encouraged me to, to keep going.

Rafael Testai:

What is something you've done, perhaps an activity or a task that has helped take your product design engineering skills from average, to Above Average, and why?

Jacob Morrise:

Honestly, a lot, some of the best tests I've done are things that I've kind of done that weren't necessarily work related, but like a regular job related, but more kind of side projects, trying to get things going. And a lot of that's because when you go and work at a large corporation, or whatever you've got, you've got 100 engineers there. And if you don't know how to do something, you can just kind of rely on them to pick up the slack or whatnot. But when you're doing it by yourself, when you're the only design engineer, you have to figure it all out yourself. You got to go and search for manufacturers forget manufacturing methods, figure out ways to get the thing built correctly, all those kinds of thing, it's all on your shoulders. And I think that's for me, that's been the best way to learn is where I don't really have an option to just kind of punt. But I've got to gotta go off and figure this stuff out myself. So even people are working in corporations and large places, if if you go off on your own and try to design even something simple, the things that you can learn doing that that you won't learn doing it in a group is pretty tremendous.

Rafael Testai:

Well, well, number one, it must feel a lot of pressure. If you're given a project and you got to figure it out yourself. And they're 10 mouths to feed. That's a lot of press a lot of incentive right to get it right.

Jacob Morrise:

Oh, yeah, yeah, well, and I mean, part of its you got, you have pride, I've got pride in my work and what I do. And so both not being able to figure out how to do something is it's kind of a pride issue. And I want to want to show that I can do it. And the other thing is you want to do it well, so that people don't come back and say, Why did you design it this way? Why isn't this working whatnot. So it's kind of just being hat taking pride in the work that you do and trying to do your best.

Rafael Testai:

Understand? Let's see. So if I understand correctly, one can gain a lot more, a lot more responsibility and experience if you're working on projects by yourself, as opposed to working in a proof group project. Because if you don't know something, then somebody else can fill in the gaps. Let's see. But what if you write off college you join a large company, and that's not the case for you. How can you pick up on those skills by side projects, I suppose?

Jacob Morrise:

Yeah, come up. I mean, most engineers have at least one often many ideas of, hey, I'd really like to have this design someday, or this would be cool or wouldn't be great if the world had this or whatever. And my suggestion to people is just pick one of those pick one that's not, not maybe super difficult, that's not going to be super expensive to prototype and whatnot, and, and build something, even if it's just for the experience, build something, figure out how to get it made, do all those things. And there's so many, there's so many more things to, to design engineering than just the straight design. There's customer feedback, and there's rework and there's manufacturing all those pieces that add into it that you may not get unless you're seeing the whole project through a lot of the jobs, I've had it big places, I don't even, I kind of don't even see the beginning or the end of the project a lot of the time. But when I'm doing my own stuff, I have a few things that I sell on Amazon that I designed and got handmade, all that stuff myself. And when you see the whole project three, you can you see where all the things interconnect. And what's important, and it's not just this kind of thrown over the wall design like they talk about, but it's got to be there for everything and see every part and it helps you become a better designer, because you know, oh, this is this is the best way to design this. So this is what it needs to manufacture the cheapest or the easiest or the best or whatnot. So it's good to see the whole project at least a few times from start to finish.

Rafael Testai:

Jeez, so many questions I want to ask you after sharing that with me. Let's see, number one would be what if we are a junior design engineer, and we want to work in our own project to do the things that you just described. So we can improve our skills and learn how everything works. But we at the end of the day, it works. But we didn't know if it could have been done better than likelihood this could have been done better. Who can give us that feedback? Who do you recommend that we go to to get feedback on improvements?

Jacob Morrise:

Well, one is just anybody. Anybody that would use that kind of product, you can get a lot of feedback from someone who's not a not a product designer. Just saying, Hey, here's this thing I made. Try it out what you think. And people will tell you right off Oh man, it's too bulky here. It's, it's weighs a lot more than I thought or the zippers, hard done zippers, all those kinds of things. So that's the first one is just anybody you know, that would use that kind of product. And then there's, I don't know, I can't say for everybody. But for me, if someone was to come and say, Hey, can you give me five minutes of advice on this, I'd be more than happy to share. And I'm sure there's many, many product designers out there that be happy to kind of just give some pointers or tips to somebody,

Rafael Testai:

I was going to say that now your inbox is going to feel with five minutes of advice. Everyone's going

Jacob Morrise:

part of being a part of it for me is just helping and being being part of it with everyone else. That's one of the reasons why I love LinkedIn, for example, is seeing what other people are doing. It's encouraging and engaging that network even when it's maybe not monetarily valuable. It can be mentally valuable to see, hey, there's other people out there doing the same stuff, and how are they getting through things? And what can I glean? And giving back as part of that part of that whole thing. It's not just a one way street. It's a given take learn things, share it with other people.

Rafael Testai:

Well said, now let's talk about the Amazon that you reference. Because not all the mechanical design engineers that I've come across, they can actually say that they have products on Amazon and in the marketplace. If you don't mind me asking if there are no restrictions, what are maybe a couple of these items, I can Google them right now.

Jacob Morrise:

So I sell so I've got three three products I've designed specifically that are as unique to me one is a a wallet size, plastic credit card shape comb that goes in your wallet. So a decent number of those. Another one is a switch cover that you put over your garbage disposal switch. So it's hard for kids to turn on. It's kind of a pressing push up type of thing that is easy to install. And when you let go, it turns the garbage disposal off. And then I have a key that works for certain Woodford brands hosts pick it. You can take the handle off your host pick it outside so you kids don't turn it on. But you have a key that will turn it on on your keychain at all times.

Rafael Testai:

And these products that you just mentioned that are there your ideas or customer ideas, they help.

Jacob Morrise:

They're all mine. They're all mine. Yeah. What's what's the most

Rafael Testai:

expensive part of launching your own ideas to Amazon?

Jacob Morrise:

Many times it's tooling. So there's a few things it kind of depends on the product for a plastic product. It's usually tooling and initial order. So the products I got had like a 500 piece, Mo q minimum order quantity. And then it was several $1,000 of tooling for these little parts. And then there's obviously, most of what I get made is in China. So there's a pretty hefty shipping cost. But if you can, if you can work around that do something that's, I thought about doing things that are 3d printed just to test market stuff and sending those into Amazon. I mean, you can do it for a lot cheaper, depending on what what your manufacturing processes?

Rafael Testai:

Well, my concern with that would be, let's say that you come up with something that's a 3d print, and adapter for something, whatever the case, and it starts selling, right, so you make some blueprints, that's market validation. What prevents a NACA from China to copy you and take over?

Jacob Morrise:

Well, that's sometimes that's really hard. And one that is, helps protect is obviously a patent. To is kind of the first to market thing if you've, if you're making an impact. And yet, first to market three is just how good is your marketing? Unfortunately, my marketing is not great. That's, I can do product design, my marketing skills aren't aren't awesome. So you probably want to get somebody if you're doing really well, you may want to get a marketing guy on board with you to help you mitigate some of those risks and issues. But that's, yeah, that's, that's part of the part of the game of product design is your, your stuff is never perfectly secure. Because someone could have invented it before you and you don't know because their patent hasn't been issued or whatever, or somebody can come in and start making it there's, there's always the risk. It's product development is a gamble. It's a gamble that you'll be able to get it to work right. It's a gamble that people want to buy it it's a gamble that you won't have someone come and easily rip it off and undercut sale you and so you don't you end up losing sales. It's it's a it's a gamble that sometimes pays off and sometimes doesn't. But it's still kind of fun.

Rafael Testai:

A bit of a time when it really paid off for you.

Jacob Morrise:

I'm hoping I actually have a I've designed a stroller that folds down very, very compactly that I've filed a patent for last year. And I'm hoping to get find a licensing partner for and get that out. But it's I'm still on the manager hope that something something hits it out of the park really well. I've done I've had products that have done really well. They just weren't mine before. I did the mechanical design for the very first ring doorbell for No way.

Rafael Testai:

I have one of those not the first one button. But ring. I'm familiar. Okay.

Jacob Morrise:

Yeah. So I was I was doing mechanical design work on that for the, at the very beginning. So I've seen that kind of explode. So it's kind of cool to see those around them like, Hey, I did the first one of those people know what this is?

Rafael Testai:

Nice. How do you decide which products to feature on your website? And if you want to share with the listeners, we'll put in the show notes. But what's your website?

Jacob Morrise:

It's Maurice products.com, m o r r i s e products.com.

Rafael Testai:

Have you decided which products to feature because if you say rain if I were you I would have put that one like front and center to get that credibility, right.

Jacob Morrise:

Yeah, so I use that sometimes I mainly on my website it put things that are my own intellectual property. But that's a good point. I probably should should update some things and figure out what I can what I can safely share it on there as I have done this project because I've done I mean, dozens of things that that have been for sale before.

Rafael Testai:

Right? And I just went to your website that click shop and I see the three Amazon items that you just described before I see the comb. I see the witch Yes. Okay.

Jacob Morrise:

So then the nice part about those all three of those came out of the personal necessity of something that I really wanted to have. And a couple of those came out of I was just gonna build it anyway for myself and I'm like, hey, I can make a product out of this thing.

Rafael Testai:

Yes, I have so many questions for you. Let's see this. This is turning out great. So you don't have to give away a secret sauce by all means, but I'm just curious ring it's a pretty big company. Most listeners listen to this. They know that little ring doorbell that has the camera. How does a company of that size? Find and strike a deal with you for you to develop the mechanical design for them.

Jacob Morrise:

Well, in that case, that was me working for another company that did consulting. Kind of a. So it wasn't my own personal consulting work. So it was a bigger, larger company than my own that came to us through sand, some other work that we had done.

Rafael Testai:

And when one is a mechanical design engineer, if you worked in the ring project, is it okay for one to feature the ring on one's personal website? Or that does infringe on anything?

Jacob Morrise:

To be honest, I don't know, which is part of why it's not on my website, because I'm not sure what the requirements are there.

Rafael Testai:

Okay. Well, I'm just like, I'm just amazed that you worked on that. That's, that's really cool. All right, well, switching gears, I wanted to talk about the Capstone that you helped the Capstone students, senior capstone project students, with their engineering projects. And if you could tell us a little bit more background on that.

Jacob Morrise:

Yeah, so I went to BYU for my master's degree. And a couple years ago started doing just they have coaches for the Capstone groups. Usually, people who are out in industry who've done product design before who can kind of mentor and assist the group of Capstone students. So I did that a couple of years. Really good experience, great working with students really awesome to see kind of their, their excitement and drive to do product design, because for most of them, it's kind of the first time they've really ever done a real product design for a real company. Yeah, so did last year, we did a Zeno. electrospun is electrospinning as a process of applying strands of, of plastic down to make a membrane that can filter out particles, COVID and other types of particles. And so the one last year that we worked on was this electrospun Mask, filter, that my team did, just really kind of a neat experience to see how good some of those students coming out are and watching that drive.

Rafael Testai:

What sets apart the best, and I want to really specify the niche, the mechanical product design engineering students from the average ones, what's the difference,

Jacob Morrise:

um, creativity and a willing to just do. There's, I've often thought there's kind of two types of people in the world, there's the type that will do what, what they're told at work. And there's the types that will kind of step by step, hey, do this, this, this, this, and there's the type that will do whatever they needed to, to finish the project. And those kinds of types that can say, Hey, I know what needs to be done. I don't exactly know how to do it. But I'll figure it out. That's kind of the best ones is the ones that can think outside of the box and just figure out a way to get things done without having to be instructed as to this is exactly what you need to do. But it's the kind of creative thinking that's, I'm not even sure how teachable that is or if it's just in built into certain people, but that's kind of the best, the best type of design engineers, the ones that can think outside the box,

Rafael Testai:

you basically beat me to it, I was gonna ask you if there if that can even be taught. I'm hopeful that it can be taught to people because it sounds like it's a difference between being a good engineer and a great engineer that capability of equipment things out. And if there's like a process or a checklist to freak things out.

Jacob Morrise:

Well, it's funny, I was talking to my older brother, who was a has a degree in physics yesterday about this very thing. And it was kind of, we're both both talking about how nice it is that we can figure out and troubleshoot things. And part of it is just a willingness to just go and try. It's this, I just ran into something that I have no idea how to how to get past. And I'm going to go I'm going to google it. I'm going to think I just whatever way I could do and try try whatever it is until I find a solution. And so I think if there's a way to teach it, it's almost self taught by just just doing whatever it takes to get past that hurdle.

Rafael Testai:

Other than what we've just discussed. Do you have any other advice from senior students in their capstone projects?

Jacob Morrise:

A lot of times that the best way to use that is to use it as a Not as a class, but as a learning experience, you're going to go out into the world and be in a lot of different industries doing a lot of different things. And every industry and every company is different, their documentation is different, their design process is different. But the more exposure you can have to it, the better off you're going to be to just every different way, every time I have a client, they're going to expect they expect different things from me. They want different types of payment structure, or timeline or design practice or involvement in different projects. And it's one of the things you learn from Capstone and from school is just, I mean, even even regular classes is having different clients that want things a little different way. And you got to kind of learn to be able to adapt to be a successful, successful accessible vendor to any client you have. Regardless of kind of what their individual needs are,

Rafael Testai:

I'm so happy to bring that up. So if I understand correctly, at the moment, you are basically a one man show doing everything in your company and providing consulting, mechanical design engineering services, is that correct? That's correct. Okay. So like you just mentioned, every customer is different? And is it safe to assume that they didn't teach you in college how to deal with every different customer?

Jacob Morrise:

That is very safe to assume?

Rafael Testai:

So this has been very valuable to listeners? What advice could you give them? If they're one day striving to have a similar life dynamic to yours? Maybe having multiple children's and maybe being the owner of a one man show company? How do you pick up the skill of learning how to manage different customers?

Jacob Morrise:

One is you've just got to, you've got to kind of understand one that people are different and different than you. And you need to know what you need to figure out what they expect. Because some, some clients will expect not very much as a deliverable, and other clients will expect everything. So when you're negotiating a contract, or what you're going to do, figure out what they expect, and then try to meet it. You can't. At the same time, you can't roll over backwards when they come back and say hey, well, you did this, but I really wanted this, this and this. So you have to be clear about what what you're providing them. And what not only what you think they should be provided, but what they expected to be provided or end up having issues where they feel like they only got half of what they expected. And you feel like you've done way too much work. And so communication and understanding what the deliverable and what they expect is really the the prime thing.

Rafael Testai:

Would you say that what would you say is the most enjoyable part of being a one man show? Is that what you you call it one man show? works? Okay, yeah. What's the most enjoyable part of running a one man show engineering business?

Jacob Morrise:

For me, it's the flexibility I can want is that there's just a lot of different things to do. So it's hard to get bored doing anything, because you're going back and forth between totally different products and different customers and different things and having the flexibility to do to do what I need to do is nice. I mean, one night, I can say, I can have some free time and think, Hey, I could go do a couple hours worth of work. And that would be fine. And one morning, it can be hey, I need to do this or that and take that time off. But it also gives me more flexibility to do some of my own products, spend some time on things that will hopefully become lucrative in the future. So it's, to me, it's your focus, you're building your future, both short term and long term at the same time.

Rafael Testai:

Perfect. Well, I think this is a good place to take a quick pause and share with our listeners that Team pipeline.us is where you can learn more about how we help medical device and other product engineering or manufacturing teams develop turnkey equipment, custom fixtures and automated machines to correct rise, inspect, assemble, manufacture and perform verification testing on your devices. So the next question I was going to ask is, how do you keep the money flowing? Because once you finish a project, do you have another project lined up or how does that work?

Jacob Morrise:

That's a good question. So I've I've realized that I've realized that my when you when you work for a regular company have extra money in the bank, it's kind of extra money, you can go and use for vacation or work on your house or buy a new car or whatever, when you work for yourself. For me, at least, it's like I don't have extra money, I just have time, money equals time. So if I have money in the bank, it means Hey, you've got this much time before you have to have a new contract or before you're going to have to go get a new job or whatever. So I actually keep a big detailed spreadsheet of how much money I have and what my expenses are going to be. So I know at any given time have got this much money. Before I have to take out a loan or get a new job, or whatever it is, and then just try to work keeping keeping jobs coming in all the time.

Rafael Testai:

Oh, no, this is an inappropriate question. But it made me laugh. But if anything, if it all comes crashing, burning down, which I hope that's never the case, do you have like a list of employers that you're gonna reach out to if that were to have happen?

Jacob Morrise:

I don't have a list of employers, but I do have contingency plans? Oh, yeah. I've done things like alright, so if we had to sell our house, we could buy a house at this play in this city, and work there and be able to work for this much longer. Or if I had to take out a loan or different so I've got all these contingency plans of what if it all comes crashing down? What are my options?

Rafael Testai:

Nice. Contingency Plan? Let's go.

Jacob Morrise:

Yeah, I do keep a finger on the job market to just to kind of make sure I know what's going on.

Rafael Testai:

How did you know that it was time for you to get started with your own companies a big leap of faith?

Jacob Morrise:

Yeah, it is. So I've wanted to do it for a long time. That's kind of always been my goal. actually happened on this entrepreneurship class that I took a little over three years ago. And what was the name? It's growing and starting a business. And it was, so I was taking that class, it's kind of a group class and was thinking about, hey, this is what I want to do. So I'd like to be and as I've gotten more into it, I started getting more excited about it. And I I mean, I brought the idea up with my wife, a lot of times, I always just scared her to death of how is this? How can we even do this? I'd watch people on Shark Tank who've gone on and mortgaged their house to do things and that, wow, how do you get to where you're willing to do that? And this time, I was like, you know, I really want to do this. And I brought it up with my wife. And she's like, you know, I feel good about this. I'm not I'm not scared, I think this is going to be okay. And so that's kind of what what gave me the go ahead is my wife and I both felt felt comfortable. And the other nice thing is, I've got, I've got an education, I can go get another job if I need to. So there's always the my family's not going to be high and dry. If it doesn't work out. Just kind of back up there too. So that's nice.

Rafael Testai:

This class about growing and starting a business. I'm googling that right now to put it in the show notes. Or is it who hosts class?

Jacob Morrise:

It's, it actually is a one that I did through a church group. It's the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints group that does it. They do it in just small, small groups, and probably all over the all over the country.

Rafael Testai:

Church of Jesus christ.org Yes. Okay. I see, perfect.

Jacob Morrise:

It's kind of just a bunch of people get together and there's a book and everyone learns and kind of says, This is what I want to do. And we kind of tried to build businesses together a little bit.

Rafael Testai:

Okay. Well, we're getting towards the end of the podcast, just a few questions left. I was gonna ask you for what, when students are in engineering of school, a lot of what they learn is theoretical, would you agree? Yes. Okay. So what skills can they pick up while they're in school, so that when they join the workplace, they can be contributors to if they're, if they want to be basically your career, which is a mechanical product design engineers, what skills can they pick up on? How do they pick up those up other than what we already discussed, which is the projects?

Jacob Morrise:

Yeah, so one is, there's for where I was, there's a few elective possibilities you could take and so one is to take the elective classes that apply. I wish I'd done more, learned a little more electrical, because I do a lot of a lot of design work. Incorporating electrical things into products. So that would have been really nice. Getting involved with, with groups that do things that you're interested in getting internships is huge. And then one thing that I'm always impressed by when people are looking for a job is the people that do things, do design work and things just as a hobby. Like, yeah, I've done, I did this in my garage, I designed this thing and built it in my garage, those things kind of give you a lot of that experience. And a lot of, frankly, help with the drive of why What are you trying to do? And what do you want to do? So kind of doing things on your own is always a big thing for me.

Rafael Testai:

Fantastic. Well, is there something that I haven't asked you that I should have asked you?

Jacob Morrise:

Oh, man, probably can't think of anything off the top of my head. But yeah, just there's a lot of stuff that goes into it. Just learn as much as you can. There's gonna be a business side and a marketing side and all those things and whatever, whatever information, whatever stuff you can glean from whatever sources kind of is gonna come back and help you.

Rafael Testai:

Alright, perfect. Well, with that I want to do thank you for being on the podcast and any last words for our listeners, and how can they find you?

Jacob Morrise:

Maurice products.com. If you have any questions, feel free to message me on there. Look me up on LinkedIn and connect, happy to happy to assist and happy to collaborate with whoever's interested. All right.

Rafael Testai:

Thank you, Jacob.

Jacob Morrise:

Thank you.

Aaron Moncur:

I'm Aaron Moncure, founder of pipeline design, and engineering. If you liked what you heard today, please share the episode. To learn how your team can leverage our team's expertise developing turnkey equipment, custom fixtures and automated machines and with product design, visit us at Team pipeline.us. Thanks for listening